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Food Myths for Kids

Food Myths for Kids

Over the years, we’ve all been given advice on certain type of food. But, just how much of that is true? Myths and preconceived notions are busted in this section, arming you with the right knowledge for your child’s nutrition.

Myth : Potatoes are just fattening and leads to knee pain.
Fact : Potatoes have a bad reputation as either a french fry or a nutrition less white carb, when in fact they provide twice as much potassium as a banana, vitamin B6 for nerves and mood, vitamin C and fiber. A person with blood sugar issues, diabetes or weight problems might want to limit their potato intake, but the rest of us should enjoy them in moderation to reap their vitamin and mineral benefits.

Myth: Infants should not be given curd.
Fact : Infants after 6 months of age can have unsweetened curd that adds protein, calcium, and aids digestion.

Myth : Cucumbers are nothing but water.
Fact : Yes, cucumbers are 95 percent water, helping our bodies stay hydrated in hot temperatures, but they also provide antioxidants such as vitamin C
and beta-carotene that help us fight cellular damage, B vitamins that support nerve health, potassium for heart health, and fiber.

Myth: Brown bread is healthier.
Fact: Whole wheat bread is healthier as brown bread is often white bread and may have added brown color.

Myth: Browning in bananas and apples is due to the presence of iron.
Fact: Browning in bananas and apples is due to oxidation of polyphenols and not due to iron content.

Myth: Breastfed infants need water.
Fact: Breastfed infants (<6 months) don’t need water as they get enough water from breast milk

Myth: Babies should be given apple juice as their first food.
Fact: Whole fruits can be given stewed or mashed as they have more fiber and nutrition.

Myth: Calories don’t matter for kids.
Fact: Kids should be given food that’s rich in vitamins and minerals, but low in fat and sugar to avoid childhood obesity.

Myth : Cucumbers are nothing but water.
Fact : Yes, cucumbers are 95 percent water, helping our bodies stay hydrated in hot temperatures, but they also provide antioxidants such as vitamin C
and beta-carotene that help us fight cellular damage, B vitamins that support nerve health, potassium for heart health, and fiber.

Getting kids to eat vegetables is all about positive reinforcement. If they have good experiences with one vegetable, especially a green one, then they are more likely to open their minds to another. So if your kid will eat the minor-league vegetables like iceberg lettuce, then serve away: That salad might just be the warm-up to champion vegetable-eating behavior later.

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