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Devloping milestones in childrens!

Devloping milestones in childrens!

Devloping milestones in childrens means working on those specific key areas tht will enhance and encourage the child overall development. These milestones acts as a base for overall development in childrens, as it is assumed that every children must know and should master in these skills. Another question related to it must raises in minds of parents and i.e.- What is child development? How does it take place in childrens?

So basically child development is a process every child goes through. This process involves learning and mastering skills like sitting, walking, talking, skipping, and tying shoes. Children learn these skills, called developmental milestones, during predictable time. Childrens develop skills in five main areas of development, these are-

  1. Cognitive devlopment: This is the child’s ability to learn and solve problems. For example, this includes a two-month-old baby learning to explore the environment with hands or eyes or a five-year-old learning how to do simple math problems.
  2. Social and emotional development: This is the child’s ability to interact with others, including helping themselves and self-control. Examples of this type of development would include: a six-week-old baby smiling, a ten-month-old baby waving bye-bye, or a five-year-old boy knowing how to take turns in games at school.
  3. Speech and language development: This is the child’s ability to both understand and use language. For example, this includes a 12-month-old baby saying his first words, a two-year-old naming parts of her body, or a five-year-old learning to say “feet” instead of “foots”.
  4. Fine motor skill development: This is the child’s ability to use small muscles, specifically their hands and fingers, to pick up small objects, hold a spoon, turn pages in a book, or use a crayon to draw.
  5. Gross motor skill development: This is the child’s ability to use large muscles. For example, a six-month-old baby learns how to sit up with some support, a 12-month-old baby learns to pull up to a stand holding onto furniture, and a five-year-old learns to skip.

The National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities has recently launched a campaign to promote child development.

CLEARLY DEFINING DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES:

A developmental milestones is a skill that a child acquires within a specific time frame. For instance, one developmental milestone is learning to walk. Most children learn this skill or developmental milestone between the ages of 9 and 15 months.
Milestones develop in a sequential fashion. This means that a child will need to develop some skills before he or she can develop new skills. For example, children must first learn to crawl and to pull up to a standing position before they are able to walk. Each milestone that a child acquires builds on the last milestone developed.

TYPICAL MILESTONES CHILDREN’S LEARN AT DIFFERENT AGES: 

We know know that our brains are not fully developed at birth. In fact, a baby’s brain weighs about one quarter (1/4) of what an adult’s brain weighs!
The brain grows very rapidly during the first several years of life. During this time, your child is learning all sorts of new skills.

Because children usually acquire developmental milestones or skills during a specific time frame or “window”, we can predict when most children will learn different skills.

CONSEQUENCES OF NOT MEETING UP THESE DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES: 

Each child is an individual and may meet developmental milestones a little earlier or later than his peers. You may have heard people say things like, “he was walking before he turned 10 months, much earlier than his older brother” or “she didn’t say much until she was about 2 years old and then she talked a blue streak!” This is because each child is unique and will develop at his or her own pace.

However, there are definitely blocks of time when most children will meet a milestone. For example, children learn to walk anytime between 9 and 15 months of age. So, if your child is 13 months of age and not yet walking, there is no need to worry if he is crawling and pulling to a stand. He has acquired the skills he needs to learn to walk and may begin walking soon. However, if you have a child 15 months of age who is not yet walking, it would be a good idea to talk with your child’s pediatrician to make sure there aren’t any medical or developmental problems since age 15 months is outside of the normal “window” or time frame in which children learn to walk.

However, whenever you have questions, do not hesitate to ask a professional like your child’s doctor, nurse practitioner, or a trained child development or behavioral specialist. There are also several clinical specialists who are specifically trained in various areas of development who can be consulted. These include speech pathologists, occupational and physical therapists, developmental psychologists and audiologists.

HELPING A CHILD MEETING DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES:

As parents, we all want our children to succeed and be the best they can be. We know from research that two factors influence how your child succeeds and grows: genes and environment.

One of the factors that influence our child’s development is their genetic makeup or “genes.” Some people refer to this as “nature.” Genes are the genetic material we pass onto our children. Children are born with their “genes” in place. These genes act like a blueprint for what characteristics a child may have. For example, genes determine if a child will have blue eyes or brown eyes; they also determine if he will be left- or right-handed.

The other factor that influences child development is the environment. This includes experiences children have in their home, school and community environments. Some people refer to this as “nurture.” The environment can either improve or harm a child’s genetic blueprint. For example, malnourished children who live in third world countries may not reach their IQ potential because of the impact of their environment on their brain development. We often think we need to run out and buy special toys, music and games to stimulate our child’s development, but we have to remind ourselves that it is more important to provide the following, every-day activities you can do with your child to encourage brain development. These are-

  • Give your child lots of love and attention. No matter what a child’s age, holding, hugging, and listening are important ways to show your child they matter.
  • Interact with your child by talking, singing, playing, eating, and reading with your child. Your child will grow up feeling special and important to you. You will also learn a lot about your child’s interests and skills.
  • Read, read, read. Research has shown that children who are read to by their parents have a larger vocabulary than other children. Reading also provides children with new perspectives about the world we live in.
  • Learn some simple parenting skills for helping your child to learn how to behave. The most important parenting skills are having consistent rules, rewarding behaviors you want to see your child do more of, and having consequences for behaviors you don’t want to continue in your child.
  • Limit TV time and video time to no more than 1-2 hours of educational viewing per day.
  • Download C3’s informational handout on supporting your child’s development.
  • Ask for help when you need it from your spouse, partner, family, friends, and your child’s doctor or nurse practitioner. Parenting is wonderful but it is not always easy.

In this manner, one can contribute towards proper development in their childrens.

 

About saxenakhushi224Author

Student pursuing graduation from University of Delhi.

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